{"_id":"55dc838755be9f21004ee286","version":{"_id":"55db8f901a91690d007ad978","project":"55db8f8f1a91690d007ad975","__v":17,"createdAt":"2015-08-24T21:41:36.034Z","releaseDate":"2015-08-24T21:41:36.034Z","categories":["55db8f901a91690d007ad979","55db9856b3d6540d00886426","55dc751b00a8811900c230e3","55dc766255be9f21004ee250","55dc769200a8811900c230ed","55e4c701177b6e0d003330fa","55f4915caf0bc71900a53130","55f491b2be9c2b2100f0635d","560b22739c7be70d00100bd8","57488c53e8c6a420000b729c","574cefd95953e20e00f40f9f","5798edfd7700d30e00ad250c","579ac88234b5fd0e00b9e140","57c81c6d690c200e0047b72e","57d9b8fbda17c30e003897f1","57d9b90e608ea00e00f358d8","57d9b91cda17c30e003897f4"],"is_deprecated":false,"is_hidden":false,"is_beta":false,"is_stable":true,"codename":"","version_clean":"1.0.0","version":"1.0"},"category":{"_id":"57d9b8fbda17c30e003897f1","project":"55db8f8f1a91690d007ad975","version":"55db8f901a91690d007ad978","__v":0,"sync":{"url":"","isSync":false},"reference":false,"createdAt":"2016-09-14T20:54:19.794Z","from_sync":false,"order":4,"slug":"code-protection","title":"Code Protection"},"parentDoc":null,"project":"55db8f8f1a91690d007ad975","__v":2,"githubsync":"","user":"55dc702d7fa0290d00559106","updates":[],"next":{"pages":[],"description":""},"createdAt":"2015-08-25T15:02:31.541Z","link_external":false,"link_url":"","sync_unique":"","hidden":false,"api":{"results":{"codes":[]},"settings":"","auth":"required","params":[],"url":""},"isReference":false,"order":7,"body":"HTTP Response Splitting (or CRLF Injection Attack) can lead to poisoning of the client’s web-cache, cookies, XSS, temporary or permanent defacement of web pages. Failure to properly encode values placed in headers can lead to this vulnerability, here's how.\n\nCRLF (Carriage Return and Line Feed) characters are used to represent the End Of Line (EOL) marker in HTTP headers. When programmers write code for web applications they split headers based on where the CRLF is found. If a malicious user is able to inject his own CRLF sequence into an HTTP stream, he is able to maliciously control the way a web application functions.","excerpt":"","slug":"http-response-splitting","type":"basic","title":"HTTP Response Splitting"}

HTTP Response Splitting


HTTP Response Splitting (or CRLF Injection Attack) can lead to poisoning of the client’s web-cache, cookies, XSS, temporary or permanent defacement of web pages. Failure to properly encode values placed in headers can lead to this vulnerability, here's how. CRLF (Carriage Return and Line Feed) characters are used to represent the End Of Line (EOL) marker in HTTP headers. When programmers write code for web applications they split headers based on where the CRLF is found. If a malicious user is able to inject his own CRLF sequence into an HTTP stream, he is able to maliciously control the way a web application functions.